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Thread: Air cooling anomoly?

  1. #1

    Air cooling anomoly?

    I didn't see this posted anywhere in the air cooling forum or anyone mentioning it here or on any other website but I thought I'd throw in a few pennies to the topic FWIW.

    One of my former employers was a heavy R&D outfit. A production process we had was using a 8' x 10' oven, ramping the temps up to 750 degrees F for an hour and a half. Cooling it down as rapidly as possible became critical because of the material and process involved but pricing was an issue.

    Solution, using two fans of the same speed behind one another to inject almost ice cold air. Two fans side by side overall moved a higher quantity of air (volume) but the temps would only come down at a certain rate (plateau). Using two fans in a series produced much colder air using essentially the same energy and delivered temps that were almost 20 degrees F cooler.
    Actual cool down time of an inkanel/hastaloy mandrel went from 1.75 hours (room temp) to a little over 38 mins (room temp), almost 1/4 +/- the time.

    Somethings of note. The fans were 14" on pedestals (4 ft high) and about 1 foot from each other. I would assume the fan in the rear used the same amount of energy as it normally would at it's current speed setting (no difference). The fan in the front however was actually running faster (pushed) by the turbulence of the fan in the rear causing it to run slightly faster. The air, even at room temp coming from the front of the forward fan was actually cold, not slightly colder or cooler I mean cold.

    The engineer I was working with didn't believe me until I proved it to him. Because of the physical properties of the material involved (not the metal), the rapid cooldown with minimal investment was imperative for what we were doing. I was curious if the same thing would work for processors and if it would be more cost effective than running a water pump given their life short expectancies?
    Just a thought.

  2. #2

    Air cooling anomoly?

    I've tried that with 120mm fans outside of a case, but I didn't notice a temp decrease. You could make up a shroud and do that in a comp with two 120mm intake fans. I guess that the only issue would be noise. I may try that as a side project. I'll keep you posted.

  3. #3

    Air cooling anomoly?

    Cool Bright, I was curious about it but I've got a small case so the testing part for me currently is out of the question. The other issue is the distance of course of the two fans which I think is the key to the airflow and temps? In other words not putting them directly on top of each other but possibly either using or not using a shroud.

  4. #4

    Air cooling anomoly?

    I know what you mean, and I have a dead 38mm fan that I can remove the blades from and use as a shroud. I'll post pics/results in a bit.

  5. #5

    Air cooling anomoly?

    I am very curious myself. With any luck you will have good results. The only thing that makes me doubt the good results is how low of cfm computer fans are compared to the static pressure, but good luck bright.

    I'll keep my fingers crossed for a major difference in temps.


  6. #6

    Air cooling anomoly?

    "The only thing that makes me doubt the good results is how low of cfm computer fans are compared to the static pressure, but good luck bright."

    Excellent point and one I had also considered. I would still hope there might be a slight difference in the end resulting temperature of the forward fan as compared to it running solo.
    If so, a slight power mod in the fan speed could solve the problem but figuring out which fan needs the speed (I assume the back one) would also be another test scenario.

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