DDR Memory Reviews

OCZ DDR2 PC2-8500 Reaper HPC Edition PC Memory

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A Closer Look

   The OCZ DDR2 PC2-8500 Reaper HPC memory modules are calculated to operate at 1066MHz in dual-channel. The matched memory modules come in 2GB kits and are 1024MB per module and make use of CAS 5-5-5-15 timings. The DDR2 PC2-8500 Reaper HPC memory is set to be used at 2.3 volts, but can be pushed to 2.35 volts and still be under the OCZ warranty. That’s correct, the OCZ EVP (Extended Voltage Protection) is a feature that allows performance enthusiasts to use a VDIMM of 2.35V without invalidating their OCZ Lifetime Warranty.

OCZ made the DDR2 PC2-8500 Reaper HPC memory modules quite striking to look at. OCZ has always been trying to go in new and different directions with their heatsink designs. If you remember they had the XTC and the FlexXLC heat spreaders on past modules. The Reaper HPC heat spreader plates are made out of aluminum and are grooved to create cooling fins. Smack in the middle of the plates is a badge that tell you that this can be used in your ATI Crossfire system and that they have been tested and approved by ATI to work with their cards. Well anyone can just slap that on their product right? No!

ATI explains:

Cross over to the ultimate visual experience – ensure your gaming PC runs with ATI CrossFire Certified components.

ATI’s renowned Certification program has raised the bar and now ensures graphics cards, motherboards, power supplies and memory are tested with the CrossFire platform to ensure interoperability and meet our highest standard of quality. Only products passing these stringent tests have earned the right to bear the Certified by ATI: CrossFire logo.

OCZ DDR2 PC2-8500 Reaper HPC Edition PC Memory Memory, OCZ 1 

The opposite side of the OCZ memory module almost mirrors the first. The exception is the missing Crossfire Badge. OCZ placed a sticker with all the important information you need to know if for some reason you forget or need it when you do not have access to software with the PC off. With 5-5-5-15 timings, these modules are ready to be put to the test.

OCZ DDR2 PC2-8500 Reaper HPC Edition PC Memory Memory, OCZ 2

Let’s start taking a closer look at the heat pipe system setup on the OCZ 8500 Reaper Memory Modules. Below is a graphic that helps show how the setup works without going into all the technical mumbo jumbo. In layman’s terms the heat plates absorb the heat off the memory chips. Some of the heat is dissipated right off the plates threw heat convection. The remaining heat is removed from the plates by the heat pipe by using heat conduction. The heat rises and travels to the top position of the heat pipe. There it is meet with a heat sink that helps remove the heat by once again using heat convection. This is a never ending process and has no moving parts, thus silent cooling. 

 

OCZ DDR2 PC2-8500 Reaper HPC Edition PC Memory Memory, OCZ 3

 

We can see that a groove has been created along the top of the heat spreader plates. The heat pipe is placed in this groove and makes contact with the plate. No obvious means of material is present that show how the heat pipe is attached to the plates so that tell me that some sort of thermal epoxy paste may have been used.

OCZ DDR2 PC2-8500 Reaper HPC Edition PC Memory Memory, OCZ 4

 

That same “glue” was more than likely used to bond the multi-finned heat sink to the upper portion of the pipe. A quick thought might lead to think that a cooling fan placed so that it would blow on the heat sinks might help drop the memory modules temperature down farther. Without the correct testing setup I can not confirm this to be true, but it does sound plausible.

OCZ DDR2 PC2-8500 Reaper HPC Edition PC Memory Memory, OCZ 5

 

OCZ DDR2 PC2-8500 Reaper HPC Edition PC Memory Memory, OCZ 6

Here is a close up view of the channel and heat pipe.

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Dewayne Carel

Dewyane began in the case modding scene when it was just starting out many years ago. Shortly after that, he started Modders-Inc to help others learn how to create and have fun with PC case mods. He has created works for the likes of Bethesda, Cooler Master, ASUS, CPU Magazine, Razer, Zotac and more.

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