case mods

Rosewill THOR V2-W Full Tower Computer Case

Article Index:

Exterior: Impressions Continued

   The Rosewill THOR V2-W has a very nice front design to it, utilizing functional black mesh down the center portion of the case. It also has two non-functional pieces of the black mesh for aesthetics purposes only on each side of the center portion. The white finned areas work well with the design, with the top finned areas sweeping upward and the bottom finned areas sweeping downward. All of this blends in well with the downward angled I/O panel up top. 

   

   Moving on to the front optical drive bays we can see that we have a total of six 5.25″ black mesh external drive bays, one of which contains a removable 3.5″ cover for your card reader or even a floppy if your still old school. Personally I like the addition of these 3.5″ cutaways, as I use several different SD type cards in various cameras etc and a card reader is much needed. 

   

   As we  look to the bottom of the front panel, we see the front air intake area, which utilizes a pre-installed 230mm White LED fan to draw in fresh air through the black mesh and white honeycomb mesh of the chassis behind. 

   Looking to the right we see a small white button protruding from the white finned area. This button is used to turn on and off the White LED lights on the front 230mm intake fan, if you so wish. It blend in perfectly with the white side and is barely even noticeable unless you are looking for it.  

   As we look at the back of the Rosewill THOR V2-W we can see that is mostly white in color with the exception of the grommets and expansion slot covers being black. Though nothing spectacular the back of the case is aesthetically pleasing to the eye. 

 

     

   Looking more closely at the rear of the case first we can see the slot used to slide your fingers under to lift up and remove the top panel if you so desire. Next we have a total of 4 water cooling holes that are pre-drilled with grommets to support high end water cooling systems. Moving down below the water cooling holes, we can see that the rear chassis fan can support either a 140mm exhaust fan (pre-installed) or if you so choose you can go down to a 120mm exhaust fan. The I/O shield cut-out is right there beside the fan mount and ready for your I/O shield to be pressed in place. 

   As we look at the bottom half of the rear portion of the case we see that there are 10 expansion slots done up in black wire mesh for added ventilation. To the side of the expansion slots are 3 honeycomb mesh areas for even more ventilation for your triple or quad SLI setups. Beneath the expansion slots we find the PSU mounting area. 

   It is also worth noting here that even though the back side panel did not have any ventilation built into it, that the mounting area for the side panel has 29 honeycomb holes cut into the rear of the case to ventilate the back side of the motherboard. I’ll say this this case is well ventilated, no doubt about it. 

   

   Finally we move back around to the mother board access panel side of the case. If you look up at the top of the case here you will see a sliding button. This sliding button is what opens and closes the top vents of the case. Slid forward and the vents are closed. If you slide it towards the rear of the case those cool chevron design sections I showed you earlier open up into 5 vent shields. Under these vent shields you can see the huge area of honeycomb mesh that covers the top 230mm exhaust fan. This not only looks very cool, but is also very functional, as without the vent shields being open there would be virtually no exhaust up top. 

About Vic McGuire

Vic "XcaliburFX" began case modding in 2006, when he modded his first case for his daughter. He has had several of his creations in CPU Magazine and Maximum PC. Vic has also contributed to articles for the Computer Power User magazine about modding.

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